Recipes for Pompkin Pudding
                                        from
          American Cookery... Adapted to this Country,       
                 and all grades of life. -
Amelia Simmons

First Edition, Hartford, Connecticut, 1796:

Pompkin
No. 1.  One quart stewed and strained, 3 pints cream, 9 beaten eggs, sugar, mace, nutmeg and ginger, laid into paste No. 7 or 3, and with a dough spur, cross and chequer it, and baked in dishes three quarters of an hour.

No. 2. One quart of milk, 1 pint pompkin, 4 eggs, molasses, allspice and ginger in a crust, bake 1 hour.

A Paste For Sweet Meats
No. 7. Rub one third of one pound of butter, and one pound of lard into two pound of flour, wet with four whites well beaten; water q: s: to make a paste, roll in the residue of shortening in ten or twelve rollings--bake quick.


Second Edition, Albany, New York, 1796:
Pompkin
No. 1. One quart stewed and strained, 3 pints milk, 6 beaten eggs, sugar, mace, nutmeg and ginger, laid into paste No. 7 or 3, cross and chequer it, and baked in dishes three quarters of an hour.

No. 2. One quart of milk, 1 pint pompkin, 4 eggs, molasses, allspice and ginger in a crust, bake 1 hour.


A Paste For Sweet Meats
No. 7. Rub one third of one pound of butter, and one pound of lard into two pound of flour, wet with four whites well beaten; water as much as necessary:  to make a paste, roll in the residue of shortening in ten or twelve rollings--bake quick.



















To the eighteenth century palate this recipe made a vegetable pudding in a crust.  We now consider it to be a standard pumpkin pie.  In reproducing this recipe for one 9 inch deep dish pie I halved each recipe.  I figured the milk/cream in the recipe No. 1 to be excessive, and I speculated it would overfill the pie dish.  I was correct and the recipe that I created was exactly the right amount to fill the dish and more importantly baked in the amount of time specified.  It would be interesting to try it with an additional cup of milk as written, but I will need a large pan.  The Albany edition mentions “a dough spur” to “cross and chequer it.”  To my mind this would be a lattice style crust, but more research is needed to see if this style was common or even used in the 18th century.  A dough spur, also known as a jagging iron, was a pastry tool comprised of a toothed wheel, set in a handle for pastry work according to the notes in the modern Dover reprint of the Albany edition.  I tried putting on a lattice crust, but it simply sank into the milky filling of the pie.  I salvage what I could and simply put that crust around the edge of the pie.

The recipe for No. 2 is straightforward and an interesting twist on the pumpkin pie.  The use of molasses for a sweetener adds a fragrant bite to the smooth filling.  I used the spices mentioned in the recipe and so rather than a traditional “pumpkin pie” flavor, this pie tasted more like a silky molasses and ginger cookie.

The pumpkin that I used was a type of hubbard squash that is similar to the pie pumpkins of today and to the pumpkins of the 18th century.  One 6 pound pumpkin yielded 3 cups of pumpkin to be used for filling after it was boiled in a quart of water and strained.


















Some of the spices I had in whole form and was able to process them in a period fashion.   Others I simply used modern powdered forms.  The measurement of spices and sugars was not quantified in the original recipe so I took educated guesses based on spice use in the 18th century. 

The sugar that I use is an Indian style of cane sugar known as jaggery.  I get this sugar from local Indian/Pakistanian grocerery and it comes in a cone shape similar to an 18th century sugar. Like muscovado sugar, it has an unmistakable hint of molasses, but is slightly less sticky.  If scraped and left to dry this style of sugar hardens into large crystals like demerara sugar.  According to food historian Karen Hess demerara sugar was probably the style of sugar used for most household baking during the period.


















                                







Adaptation for No. 1
(original recipe divided in ½ for one 9 inch deep pie)
2 c pumpkin
2 c milk
3 eggs
¾ cup sugar
1/8 tsp mace
1/8 tsp nutmeg
½ tsp ginger


Bake at 400 degrees
for 45-55 minutes



This pie was orginally cross and chequered as in the recipe.  The dough sank into the filling and so I salvaged the peices and just quickly put them around the outside of the dish.


Adaptation for No. 2
(original recipe divided in ½ for one 9 inch deep pie)
1 c pumpkin
2 c milk
2 eggs
¼ c molasses
½ tsp allspice
1 tsp ginger

Bake at 400 degrees
for 60-70 minutes














Adaptation of Paste No. 7

(original recipe divided in ½ : yields two 9 inch crusts plus a little more)

½ lb room temperature butter,  divided into 3 equal parts
½ lb lard
4 c flour
2 egg whites
2 Tbs water


Combine 1/3 of the butter and all the lard and flour until crumbly.  Add egg whites and water, kneading it until it is a thick paste.  Flour the work table and the dough to make it easier to roll out the paste.   Add portions of the remaining butter from the recipe in stages, folding the dough and rerolling it. Be sure to continue flouring the table and the dough.  The dough will not become cohesive until you have spread all the butter into the paste and rolled it for at least 10 times.  Roll out dough and cut it according to the thickness and size that you need for your pan.   The baked crust has an excellent flavor, a soft and light feel and a strong integrity for shaping the edges of your crust.




















 
Crumbly start to pie paste with extra two thirds of butter in reserve for rolling into the crust
Crust after being rolled 4 times and the last of the butter being added into the paste.
Crust as it is folded for it's last rolling
Paste being measured and cut, placed into pie dish and then fluted.
Lump of jaggery pure cane sugar in upper left, sugar prepared for baking in lower left and spices used in making recipe number 1.